Wood Sisters

Ezekiel Currey

Male 1735 - 1800  (64 years)


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  • Name Ezekiel Currey 
    Born 22 Jan 1735  , Chester, Pennsylvania Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Gender Male 
    Occupation 22 Apr 1760  New London, Chester, Pennsylvania Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Died 1800  Nolansville, Williamson, Tennessee Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Person ID I6274  My Genealogy
    Last Modified 24 Nov 2020 

    Father Samuel Corry,   b. Bef 1710, Belfast, Antrim, Ireland Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Bef 21 Apr 1758, Londonderry, Chester, Pennsylvania Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age < 48 years) 
    Mother Jane ?,   b. Bef 1710, , , Ireland Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Family ID F2013  Group Sheet

    Family Elizabeth Brownlee,   b. 1741,   d. 1790, , , Tennessee Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 49 years) 
    Married 06 Nov 1759  Old Swedes Church, Wilmington, New Castle, Delaware, USA Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Children 
    +1. Jane Currey,   b. 01 Jun 1760, , Chester, Pennsylvania Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 27 Sep 1826, , Randolph, North Carolina Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 66 years)
     2. Samuel Currey,   b. 1761,   d. Aft 1830  (Age 70 years)
     3. Ezekiel Currey,   b. 1763,   d. 1851  (Age 88 years)
     4. Robert Brownlee Currey,   b. 1774, , , North Carolina Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 08 Dec 1848  (Age 74 years)
     5. John Currey
     6. Isaac Currey
     7. Elizabeth Currey,   b. 1764,   d. 1850  (Age 86 years)
     8. Margaret Currey,   b. 1764,   d. 1858  (Age 94 years)
     9. Sarah Currey,   b. 10 Sep 1766, Probably Orange County (now Randolph), North Carolina Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 30 Oct 1843, , Wilson, Tennessee Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 77 years)
     10. Mattie Currey
     11. Nancy Currey,   b. 1768,   d. 1840  (Age 72 years)
    +12. Susan Currey,   b. 1770, , Rockingham, North Carolina Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Aft 1830, , Williamson, Tennessee Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 61 years)
     13. Mary Currey,   b. 1775
    Last Modified 23 Nov 2020 
    Family ID F1999  Group Sheet

  • Documents
    Ezekiel Currey and Elizabeth Brownlee marriage record
06 Nov 1759 Old Swedes Church, Wilmington, New Castle, Delaware
    Ezekiel Currey and Elizabeth Brownlee marriage record 06 Nov 1759 Old Swedes Church, Wilmington, New Castle, Delaware
    Ancestry.com. Delaware, U.S., Marriage Records, 1750-1954 [database on-line]. Lehi, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2016.
    Original data:Marriage Records. Delaware Marriages. Bureau of Vital Statistics, Hall of Records, Dover, Delaware.
    1750 - 1886, All Sections
    Image 21 of 40
    Ezekiel Currey and Elizabeth Brownlee marriage record
06 Nov 1759 Old Swedes Church, Wilmington, New Castle, Delaware
    Ezekiel Currey and Elizabeth Brownlee marriage record 06 Nov 1759 Old Swedes Church, Wilmington, New Castle, Delaware
    Ancestry.com. Delaware, U.S., Marriage Records, 1750-1954 [database on-line]. Lehi, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2016.
    Original data:Marriage Records. Delaware Marriages. Bureau of Vital Statistics, Hall of Records, Dover, Delaware.
    1750 - 1886, All Sections
    Image 21 of 40
    Map of Guilford County Court House Battle 1781
    Map of Guilford County Court House Battle 1781
    Ancestry.com Family Tree: Knight Family Tree by stevenjknight

  • Notes 
    • Family Records
      www.curreyfamily.org
      Ezekiel Currey (1735) married Elizabeth Brownlee (Dec 6.1759) in Delaware at the Old Swedes Church. Moved to North Carolina and eventually to Nolensville, Tennessee, where he is buried.
      Ezekiel Currey- Revolutionary War. Was wounded at battle of Guilford Courthouse.
      John Currey-fought in North Carolina alongside his brother Ezekiel.

      Brandon's Family, Ancestry.com by Brandon Currey
      Ezekiel was at Alamance: He was listed as Ezekiel Cure on the regulator list. His brother John was listed as John Curey on the list. Others on the list include most of the Nashville founders such as James Robertson and a Cartwright. Unable to find any records on Elizabeth?s family but Brownlees were quite numerous in the Ulster community in Pennsylvania and in Northern Ireland registers and in Scotland, especially at Torfoot, Scotland. Undoubtedly Robert Brownlee Currey was named after her father and the Brownlee name was used by many other generations.
      Ezekiel fought at the battle of Guilford and was wounded, according to his son.
      Moved again to Middle Tennessee along with other members of his family
      Died and was buried at Nolensville in Williamson County

      Lists 12 children

    • Marriage Records
      "The Records of Holy Trinity (Old Swedes) Church, Wilmington, Del., from 1697 to 1773"; Historical Society of Delaware, 1890; p 712. Google Books, accessed 3 Oct 2016
      Dec 6 1759
      Ezekiel Currey and Elizabeth Brownlees

    • The War of Regulation
      The Regulators

      North Carolinians Opposed to Abuses by Colonial Government Officials

      Copied from the North Carolina Historical Sites Website

      Formation of the Regulators

      During the years leading up to the American Revolution many North Carolina people became strongly discontented with the way the provincial government was handling the colony's affairs. However, their quarrel was not with the form of government or the colony's laws but with abuses by government officials.

      Grievances affecting the daily lives of the colonists included excessive taxes, dishonest sheriffs, and illegal fees. Scarcity of money contributed to the state of unrest. Those living in the western part of the province were isolated and unsympathetic with the easterners and it was in those frontier counties that the War of Regulation began.

      Minor clashes occurred until the spring of 1768, when an association of "Regulators" was formed. Wealthier colonists considered them to be a mob. The Regulators never had an outstanding leader, though several men were prominent in the movement; including James Hunter, Rednap Howell, William Butler, and Herman Husband. Husband, a Quaker and follower of Benjamin Franklin, circulated political pamphlets advocating peaceful reform.

      Violent Resistance

      Discouraged over failing to secure justice through peaceful negotiations, the reformers took a more radical stand. Violence, lawlessness, and terrorism reigned. When the government retaliated against them, the Regulators defiantly refused to pay fees, terrorized those who administered the law, and disrupted court proceedings.

      It fell to royal governor, William Tryon, to bring the backcountry revolt to a speedy conclusion. In March 1771, the governor's council advised Tryon to call out the militia and march against the rebel farmers.

      Volunteers for the militia were mustered. When the expedition finally got under way, Gen. Hugh Waddell was ordered to approach Hillsborough by way of Salisbury, with Cape Fear and western militia at his command. Tryon and his army proceeded more directly toward Hillsborough. Waddell, with only 284 men, was challenged on his way by large groups of Regulators. Since he was outnumbered, the general decided to turn back. On May 11, Governor Tryon and his forces left Hillsborough intending to rescue Waddell. After resting on the banks of Alamance Creek in the heart of Regulator country, Tryon gathered his army of approximately a thousand men. Five miles away, 2,000 Regulators had assembled.

      The Battle of Alamance

      The battle began on May 16 after the Regulators rejected Tryon's suggestion that they disperse peacefully. Lacking leadership, organization, and adequate arms and ammunition, the Regulators were no match for Tryon's militia. Many Regulators fled, leaving their bolder comrades to fight on.

      The rebellion of the Regulators was crushed. Nine members of the king's militia were killed and 61 wounded. The Regulator losses were much greater, though exact numbers are unknown. Tryon took 15 prisoners; seven were hung later. Many Regulators moved on to other frontier areas beyond North Carolina. Those who stayed were offered pardons by the governor in exchange for pledging an oath of allegiance to the royal government.

      The War of the Regulation illustrates how dissatisfied much of the population was during the days before the American Revolution. The boldness displayed by reformers opposed to royal authority provided a lesson in the use of armed resistance, which patriots employed a few short years later in the American War for Independence.

      https://historicsites.nc.gov/all-sites/alamance-battleground/history

    • Battle of Guilford Court House March 1781
      Ancestry.com Family Tree: Tennessee Relations and Friends by fwmccord
      Some of the text from a brief history written by Robert Brownlee Currey dated May 12,1845 telling of his childhood, and of his father, Ezekiel.
      This is from a section recalling the weeks prior and just after the Battle of Guilford(March,1781),he says he was 6 or 7 years old at the time.

      "I heard the report of the cannon fired at the Battle of Guilford; witnessed the distress of my mother, her prayers for the unfortunate sufferers and for the success of our cause. A few weeks after this I saw an engagement between a company of mounted volunteers and a much larger force of Tories and Hessians. This commenced in full view (Deep River between) and as they approached within gunshot, my mother, very prudently, sent the children to the opposite side of the house."
      "But curiosity prompted me to take my station where I could peep past the corner and I was delighted with the caps and feathers of fur of the volunteers, their rapid movements and the reports of guns."
      "The Torey Captain was killed and several of his men. Indeed they suffered a complete defeat and rout."
      "In the infamy and fate of this Capitan Frankland there is an admonitory lesson to beware of selfish agrandisement, ambition and pride, where patriotism and love of country alone ought to be the governing principle."
      "He had professed great patriotism and devotion to the defence of his country and had offered as a candidate to command this same company of horse, but they, choosing to elect another, he therefore, lost all his patriotism ,enrolled some Tories and went to the British Army where he obtained a commission from King George, and was given a recruit of Hessians."
      "With this large company he carried on his depredations, not forgetting to avenge himself on those who had refused him the command. For the night before their defeat, thirsting for blood and plunder, they entered the neighborhood during a thunderstorm, but while in pursuit of their first intended victims, became alarmed and fled."
      "By daylight the company of Whigs were on their trail(nearly obliterated by the rain) and, after following them around a circuit of some thirty miles and witnessing the depredation committed in their flight, overtook and defeated them about noon (as above stated) and within a few miles of the starting point."
      "I saw my father bleeding and drenched with blood from wounds inflicted by a Tory's sword, with a severe cut over the head, a finger severed from his hand, and others nearly so from fending off a blow aimed at his neck."
      " The Torries from their numbers soon had the ascendency. this small company of Whigs was dispersed. My father made his way into Guilford (April or May 1781). The family followed in the Fall and we settled in that part of Guilford which afterwards fell into the new County of Rockingham. We soon after this were gratified with the news of the capture of the British Army at Yorktown."